Monthly Archives: January 2011

  • Density Rods

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    The Density Rod Set consists of two rods. The aluminum rod sinks in warm water and floats in cool. This is because cool water is more dense than warm, and the aluminum rod is made to be between those two densities. The PVC rod does the reverse – floats in warm water and sinks in cool. This time, the rod changes more than the water, becoming more dense when it is cool.

    This post was posted in Labs, Measurement & Analysis and was tagged with density rods, density, rod

  • Quantum Lab (Inquiry)

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Something that is quantized exists in multiples of a set quantity. Examples are charge [1.6 x 10-19C] or quantum energies of photons. Planck and Einstein predicted that light existed as discrete bundles called photons. Since they could not see a unit of photon energy, this lab constructs a model of how quanta was derived and visualized by scientists. In this INQUIRY lab, students will develop their own method for finding the pennies' mass.

    This post was posted in Labs, Measurement & Analysis and was tagged with quantum, Planck, Einstein, indirect measurement

  • Quantum Lab

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Something that is quantized exists in multiples of a set quantity. Examples are charge [1.6 x 10-19C] or quantum energies of photons. Planck and Einstein predicted that light existed as discrete bundles called photons. Since they could not see a unit of photon energy, this lab constructs a model of how quanta was derived and visualized by scientists.

    This post was posted in Labs, Measurement & Analysis and was tagged with quantum, Planck, Einstein, measurement

  • Picture of a Lab: Different Graph Types

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Buzz Putnam

    Picture of a Lab – Different Graph Types Station #1 investigates the relationship between force and displacement of a stretched spring. Students will discover a direct linear relationship, with an equation of the form y = mx + b. Station #2 demonstrates Boyle’s Law, or the relationship between the pressure on a gas and its volume. The graph is a hyperbola, y = 1/x. Station #3 relates light intensity to distance from the source. The graph shows an inverse-square relationship, with an equation y = 1/x2. Station #4 uses staggered, stacked blocks to result in a simple parabolic graph, where y = x2.

    This post was posted in Labs, Measurement & Analysis and was tagged with force, graphing, graph types, boyle's law, light intensity, hyperbola, parabolic graph, linear graph

  • Eureka!

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Chapter 19 Lab #51: Students will determine the volume of irregularly shaped objects and observe the relationship of their mass and volume as they use the displacement method of finding volume.

    This post was posted in Conceptual Physics 4th Edition Lab Manual and was tagged with mass, eureka, volume, displacement

  • Lab #9.7 Mechanics: Chapter 9 Dropping The Ball

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Purpose
    In this experiment, you will lift a ball and drop it. You will determine and compare the potential energy of the ball before it’s dropped to the kinetic energy of the ball after right before it hits the ground.
    Discussion
    When an object is lifted, the work done to lift the object is transformed into potential energy [...]

    This post was posted in Supplementary Conceptual Physics Labs and was tagged with conservation of energy, potential energy, dropping the ball, kinetic energy

  • Lab #9.1 Mechanics: Chapter 9 An Uphill Climb

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    In this experiment, you will determine what advantage—if any—there is in using an inclined plane to move an object to a higher elevation. Why are ramps used when lifting heavy objects? Does it make the task easier (requires less force)? Does it make the movement shorter (requires less distance)? Does it make the effort more efficient (requires less work)? Perhaps it does several of these; maybe it does none of them. In this experiment, the cart will act as the heavy object. Your task will be to move your cart a vertical distance of 20 cm above the tabletop. You will arrange a series of ramps (inclined planes) at different angles to accomplish this task. You will measure the force needed to move a cart up the incline. You will also measure the distance through which that force would be applied to finish the job. You will then calculate the work required to lift an object using an inclined plane. By the end of the experiment, you will be able to identify what an inclined plane can do for you in terms of force, distance, and work.

    This post was posted in Supplementary Conceptual Physics Labs and was tagged with energy and work, mechanics, uphill

  • Why the Sky is Blue

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Chapter 28 Lab #76: Purpose: To investigate the mechanism that causes light to scatter.

    This post was posted in Conceptual Physics 4th Edition Lab Manual and was tagged with light, sky blue, scatter

  • Density of a Solid

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Regular and irregular objects will be used. Students will devise a way of finding the volume of each object - calculating the volume of a cube or using water displacement for irregular objects. They will calculate the density of each and compare to standard values.

    This post was posted in Labs, Measurement & Analysis and was tagged with density, density of a solid, cube, block

  • Flaming Out

    Posted on January 1, 2011 by Arbor Scientific

    Chapter 28 Lab #75: Students will observe the spectra of some metal atoms.

    This post was posted in Conceptual Physics 4th Edition Lab Manual and was tagged with flaming out, metal atoms

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