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Kemtec AP Kit Complete Series

Availability: Out of stock

Product Price
Kemtec AP Kit Complete Series (Without Glassware)

Product # C2-1000

$1,445.00
Kemtec AP Kit Complete Series (With Glassware)

Product # C2-2000

$1,650.00

Kemtec AP Kit Complete Series

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The Kemtec AP Chemistry Series includes 16 labs designed to meet the essential laboratory requirements of an AP Chemistry course. As a series, these labs address the 2013 Essential Knowledge, Science Practices, and Learning Objectives established by the AP College Board. Six labs incorporate specific Inquiry components and all labs contain instructions for optional inquiry adaptations. For planning purposes, each manual contains a complete breakdown of the AP Framework correlations for each of the 16 lab experiments.

Each Individual Lab Accommodates 24 Students Working in Groups of 2
Targets Grades: 10-14


Labs Included:
Statistics: Precision and Accuracy without Glassware
Statistics: Precision and Accuracy with Glassware
Spectrophotometric Analysis of Copper: Beer’s Law
Synthesis and Gravimetric Analysis of Cobalt Oxalate Hydrate
Acid-Base Titrations: An Inquiry Investigation
Separating Substances by Adsorption Chromatography
Stoichiometry: Reactions with Copper Compounds
Stoichiometry: Mole Ratio of an Unknown
Using Colligative Properties to Determine the Molar Mass of an Unknown
Determining Molar Mass Using the Ideal Gas Equation
Reaction Rate and Order
Determining Molar Enthalpy Using Hess’s Law
Le Chatelier’s Principle
Identifying Weak Acids by pKa
Preparing Buffer Solutions and Determining Their Properties
Determining the Equilibrium Constant (and Temperature’s Effect) with Beer’s Law
Electrochemical Cells – Voltaic and Electrolytic

Statistics: Precision and Accuracy without Glassware
Use a variety of basic volumetric measuring techniques to distinguish between precision and accuracy, while identifying an unknown liquid by its density. Students work as “analytical chemists” to learn the importance of measurement reproducibility. Lessons include statistical analysis calculations of mean, standard deviation, and relative error. Students address the Inquiry Question: How is a physical constant used to verify the precision of a measuring tool? Ideal for AP Chemistry, Chemistry I or II, or Honors Chemistry. Glassware is not included. Kit designed to exceed 2013 AP NextGeneration National Standards. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Recommended: analytical balance; not included. Meets AP Science Practice 2.

Statistics: Precision and Accuracy with Glassware
Use a variety of basic volumetric measuring techniques to distinguish between precision and accuracy, while identifying an unknown liquid by its density. Students work as “analytical chemists” to learn the importance of measurement reproducibility. Lessons include statistical analysis calculations of mean, standard deviation, and relative error. Students address the Inquiry Question: How is a physical constant used to verify the precision of a measuring tool? Ideal for AP Chemistry, Chemistry I or II, or Honors Chemistry. Glassware is included. Kit designed to exceed 2013 AP NextGeneration National Standards. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Recommended: analytical balance; not included. Meets AP Science Practice 2.

Spectrophotometric Analysis of Copper: Beer’s Law
Explore the interaction of light with copper ions in solution using photons from the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Students examine the relationship between transmittance, absorbance and solution concentration using Beer’s Law (A = ε∙b∙C) after determining λmax. Fulfill the AP chemistry requirement for using a Spectrophotometer and learn to perform serial dilutions. Includes an inquiry based extension for determining the amount of copper in a penny (nitric acid not included). Experiments are adjustable to fit your lab period; minimal prep time. Ideal for AP or Honors Chemistry. Kit designed to exceed 2013 AP Next Generation National Standards. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Requires additional equipment: spectrophotometers, 10mL volumetric flasks, 1mL pipets. Meets AP Science Practices: 2, 3 & 5.

Synthesis and Gravimetric Analysis of Cobalt Oxalate Hydrate
Students will enjoy this lab as they experience multiple techniques required for AP chemistry; synthesizing cobalt oxalate hydrate by precipitation, gravimetric analysis by dehydration, and oxidation-reduction (redox) titration on a unique compound. Experiments are well delineated and can be easily adjusted to fit your lab period: minimal prep time. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: analytical balance, burets, Bunsen burners, standard laboratory glassware. Meets AP Science Practices 2 & 7.

Acid-Base Titrations: An Inquiry Investigation
Students standardize a sodium hydroxide titrant with a primary standard, KHP; then find the concentration of an unknown acid solution. Ideal for fulfilling the AP Chemistry Inquiry requirements as students investigate: What is the mass percent of citric acid in a piece of candy such as a Sour Patch Kid®, Warhead®, Smartee®, or Sweet Tart®? Minimal prep time and easily adapted to shorter lab periods. Ideal for AP or Honors Chemistry. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: stir plates, burets, 250 & 500mL volumetric flasks, 1mL pipets, pH meter (optional). Meets AP Science Practices 2 & 3.

Separating Substances by Adsorption Chromatography
Students learn the fundamentals of paper and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) as they answer the inquiry question, “What colors my food?” Analyze various candies, foods, tea extracts and pen ink while comparing and contrasting paper chromatography and TLC results to reference materials. Teach students molecular polarity and intermolecular forces. Ideal for AP Chemistry, Chemistry I or II, or Honors Chemistry. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: 24 well microtiter plates and basic laboratory supplies. Meets AP Science Practices 1 & 5.

Stoichiometry: Reactions with Copper Compounds
Perform four quantitatively different reactions utilizing copper compounds. Identify reaction type, determine mole ratios experimentally, identify limiting reactants, and determine percent yield. The reaction series provides experience synthesizing ionic compounds, a coordination complex, and elemental copper. Ideal for AP Chemistry or Honors Chemistry. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: fume hood, vacuum filtration (recommended), hot plates, balances and basic laboratory supplies. Meets AP Science Practices 2 & 6.

Stoichiometry: Mole Ratio of an Unknown
This unique, hands-on lab shows students how to treat heat as a quantitative product, using continuous variation (Job’s method). The reagent combination used provides reliable results far superior to competitor kits. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Minimal prep time; easily adapted to shorter lab periods. Suitable for Honors and AP chemistry. Additional equipment required: glassware, thermometers, and Styrofoam cups. Meets AP Science Practices 2, 3 & 5.

Determining Molar Mass by Colligative Properties
Students investigate all aspects of freezing point depression including: solvent freezing constant, van’t Hoff factor, and molar mass. Fulfill the AP required inquiry component while determining important applications of freezing point depression in everyday life. Direct students to design an experiment to resolve: What is the lowest temperature at which road treatment containing calcium chloride would be effective? Includes multiple solvents and solutes, both ionic and molecular. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: hot plates, analytical balances, thermometers, and basic lab supplies. Meets AP Science Practices 2, 3 & 5.

Determining Molar Mass Using the Ideal Gas Equation
This unique hands-on method of exploring gases allows students to compare properties of real and ideal gases (based on KMT assumptions) as they determine the molar mass of a volatile solvent. Students manipulate volume, temperature and pressure while using the ideal gas equation to compute moles of gas. Ideal for Honors or AP Chemistry. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: hot plates, balances, ring stands, glassware, and basic lab supplies. Meets AP Science Practices 1, 2 & 5.

Reaction Rate and Order
Using this superior reagent system, students are able to generate highly reproducible results from an iodine clock reaction. Students determine factors that affect reaction rates as they vary reactant concentrations, measure rates, calculate reaction orders, and calculate reaction rate constants. Activation Energy is also determined utilizing the logarithmic form of the Arrhenius equation by plotting temperature and reaction rate. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: stop watch, pipets, lab glassware. Meets AP Science Practices 1, 2 & 4.

Determining Molar Enthalpy Using Hess’s Law
This calorimetry lab uses reliable reactions as students measure temperature changes, determine the calorimeter constant and ultimately calculate the molar enthalpy of formation for magnesium oxide using Hess’s Law. Students compare lab results to standard values. Ideal for Honors or AP Chemistry. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Procedures can easily be divided or used as collaborative lessons. Additional equipment required: thermometers, balances, basic lab supplies, and Styrofoam cups. Meets AP Science Practices 2 & 7.

Le Chatelier’s Principle Featuring Ag+ reaction!
Students create and analyze four different equilibrium systems, allowing manipulation of a variety of stresses to show how systems respond by shifting in the direction that reduces stress. Students vary temperature, alter the pH of a weak acid indicator, use silver ions to draw chloride from a complex ion by precipitation, and design a set of conditions for optimum yield. Students make predictions and test their hypotheses. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, and an answer key. Ideal for AP Chemistry, Chemistry II, or Honors Chemistry. Standard lab equipment and fume hood required. Experiments are readily adjustable to fit your lab periods. Meets AP Science Practices 6 & 7.

Identifying Weak Acids by pKa
Students perform titrations on weak acids while measuring pH, perform qualitative analysis by determining pKa values of acids, perform quantitative analysis by calculating molar masses, confirm the identities of weak acids, and derive and use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Features four different weak acid solids; three monoprotic, one diprotic. Ideal for two 45 minute lab periods. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: pH meter, Burets, pipets, and volumetric flasks. Meets AP Chemistry Science Practices 2, 5, and 6.

Preparing Buffer Solutions and Determining Their Properties
Students utilize the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation in analyzing buffers. After being assigned one of the three buffer systems, pH, and component acids, bases or conjugates, students construct a buffer and test it based on their own calculations. Students compare the pH changes of their buffer to those of distilled water and other solutions. Minimal prep time required. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: pH meter, glassware. Meets AP Science Practices 4 & 7.

Determining the Equilibrium Constant (and Temperature’s Effect) with Beer’s Law
Loaded with important concepts and techniques for the AP chemistry student; determine the equilibrium constant using Le Chatelier’s principle and Beer’s Law (using spectrophotometry) to determine equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. Addresses the inquiry question: What is the effect of temperature on the equilibrium constant? Minimal prep time; easily adapted to three shorter lab periods. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: spectrophotometers, glassware, and thermometers. Meets AP Science Practices 2 & 7.

Micro-scale Electrochemical Cells – Voltaic and Electrolytic
Analyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions and become familiar with the activity series of metals and its importance in predicting the products of replacement reactions. Students test both Voltaic and Electrolytic cells, and predict and measure cell voltages. Lessons include learning to separate oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions into half reactions, as well as identifying both anode and cathode activity. Minimal prep time required. State of the Art instructor’s manual features background material, easy to follow stepwise protocols, assessment questions, sample data, modeled calculations, and an answer key. Additional equipment required: a DC voltmeter, glassware. Meets AP Science Practices 3 & 7.