Monthly Archives - January 2005

Demos for Motion

Conceptual Physics chapter demos for teachers discussing projectile motion, non-linear motion, friction and air resistance.

Vertical Acceleration Demonstrator

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$25.00
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Measuring Constant Velocity

Measuring Constant Velocity    

A moving object experiences a change in its position in a certain time. For constant velocity, the change in position over each equivalent time period is constant. Students will graph the position vs. time of a moving car. The graph will be a straight line whose slope is the car’s velocity.

   Indicates the level of technology required for the lab activity.  Good for grade levels 5 through 9 Good for grade levels 9 through 12    

Required Equipment
Constant Velocity Car, Measuring Tape, Stopwatch, Chalk, Graph paper

Acknowledgements: Thank you to Cary Busby for her work in developing this lab. Cary is a former high school physics teacher and has presented physics related workshops at NSTA conferences and State science conferences around the country.

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Constant Velocity Car (Carts)

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$8.50

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Analyzing Motion

force 1 hd

Science students: Start your engines!

“When I pull out the constant velocity cars, I usually hear a chorus of, ‘All right!’ from the class. That’s what I think, too, because these powerful miniature dune buggies are so effective at helping my students really grasp what constant motion is and how to graph it. They get immediate kinesthetic and visual feedback, and I get the satisfaction of making a solid lesson super fun.” – Mark Davids

 

Constant Velocity Demonstration

lab force 1a

You’ll need paper strips, markers, plus a constant velocity car and a metronome that beeps. Have students lay out paper strips to form a “road” for the car. Explain that they’ll start the car, then mark its position at each beep of the metronome.

Start the metronome and have students start their cars. They will clearly see that the marks are equally spaced. Have them predict how the marks would fall with a faster car, and then have them check by increasing the speed of the car.

Have students graph the position vs. time results and they’ll see nice, smooth curves that suggest the slope of the graph represents a constant velocity. They can also run the cars in the opposite direction — and discover that negative velocity produces a negative slope when graphed.

mark

Mark Davids is a Presidential Award winner and recipient of the Excellence in Pre-College Physics Teaching Award, Mark has been teaching students and teachers for more than 37 years. He has written curricula, content standards and served as a grant reviewer, along with presenting at local, state and national conferences.

 

Required Equipment

Paper strips, Markers, a Constant Velocity Car and a Metronome.
Recommended quantity per lab group: 1

Constant Velocity Car (Carts)

In Stock SKU: 44-1090
$8.50
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Lab # 4.1 Mechanics: Chapter 2 Go! Go! Go!

Purpose
In this experiment, you will plot a graph that represents the motion of an object.

Discussion
Sometimes two quantities are related to each other, and the relationship is easy to see. Sometimes the relationship is harder to see. In either case, a graph of the two quantities often reveals the nature of the relationship. In this experiment, students will plot a graph that represents the motion of a real object.

Required Equipment

Constant Velocity Car, butcher paper (or continuous—imperforated—paper towel, or equivalent)
access to tape, stopwatch, meter stick, graph paper.

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Student Worksheet   Teacher Notes

Constant Velocity Car (Carts)

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$8.50

Digital Stopwatch Timer

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Meter Stick 6 pack

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$18.00

1000g/10 N Spring Scale

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Hooked Mass Set

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$85.00

Roll of String

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The “Graph Paper”, “Tape” and “Butcher Paper” required for this lab is readily available at your office or school supply store. Each lab group would need access to one of each see lab detail for specific use.

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Lab # 2.1 Mechanics: Walking the Plank

Lab # 2.1   Mechanics:  Walking the Plank

Purpose

In this activity, students will measure and interpret the forces acting on an object when the object is in equilibrium.

Discussion

Consider two sign painters who work on a scaffold (a plank of wood suspended by ropes at both ends). They might wonder about the tension in the ropes that support their platform. They are in a state of equilibrium, but how do the forces relate to one another? Their weights are downward forces and the tensions in the ropes suspending the scaffold are upward forces. While the weights of the painters never change, the tensions in the ropes seem to change when the painters move along the platform. In this activity, you will arrange a platform similar to a painter’s scaffold. You will measure the forces acting on the scaffold when it is in various arrangements. You will interpret the forces to determine the condition of equilibrium.

Required Equipment

Meter stick, 2 Ring Stands, 2 crossbars (metal rods), 2 rod clamps, 2 collar hooks, 2 spring scales (5- or 10-newton capacity), slotted masses (two 200 g and one 500 g), 2 – 20-cm lengths of string, Bulls Eye level (optional)

Download

Student Worksheet   Teacher Notes

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Ring Stand Base with Rod

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Meter Stick 6 pack

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Metal Rod

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1000g/10 N Spring Scale

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Hooked Mass Set

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Roll of String

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