Conceptual Physics Alive: Newton's Third Law

Item # 99-0060

Arbor Scientific

99-0060

31758626783305

$7.95
In Stock

Master teacher Paul Hewitt teaches concepts on Newton's 3rd Law and demonstrates with numerous examples, including a tug-of-war.

Please note: The digital content will be sent to the email provided during checkout, once your order has been processed. Order will be processed no later than the next business day.
Digital format: The email you will receive will contain a hyperlink to download a .ZIP file containing a digital video (.MP4) and questions set with answers (.PDF).
Notice: This digital content can be used in physical or remote classroom settings (e.g., Google Classroom, Canvas, etc.), or Homeschool. Replicating and distributing this digital content for profit without the authority of the copyright owner is an infringement of the copyright.

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Conceptual Physics Alive: Newton's Third Law includes a digital video and questions set with answers.

Observe Paul Hewitt teach in a classroom with real students, using engaging demonstrations and artwork. In this video, Paul Hewitt teaches Newton's 3rd Law: The notion that a force is a push or a pull is developed. The concept that forces always occur in pairs as interactions between one thing and another is supported with numerous examples, including a tug-of-war.

Newton's 3rd Law Includes:

  • Hewitt begins with "I can't touch you without you touching me in return." Then Newton's 3rd law is defined.
  • Force defined as an interaction.
  • Demonstration of blocks pulled by an elastic band.
  • Demonstration of a tug of war with visitor, Helen Yan (co-author of the Next-Time Questions that accompanies the high school edition of Hewitt's Conceptual Physics).
  • Fingers stretching a rubber band produce a single interaction. Likewise with the gravitational interaction between the earth and moon.
  • Action, A on B; Reaction, B on A.
  • Examples of walking on the floor; swimming, tires pushing road, tug of war, pulling up on bike handlebars, weighing oneself and pulling up (or pushing down) on the sink, dropping an object.
  • Different accelerations shown with exaggerated symbols.
  • Examples of gun kick, firing squad, rocket fired to the moon, being stranded on ice, and punching a sheet of paper.

Next-Time Question: Horse-and-cart problem sketched on board: How can the horse exert a force to move the cart when the cart exerts as much reaction force? (SEE RESOURCES TAB FOR MORE)

Please note: The digital content will be sent to the email provided during checkout, once your order has been processed. Order will be processed no later than the next business day.

Digital format: The email you will receive will contain a hyperlink to download a .ZIP file containing a digital video (.MP4) and questions set with answers (.PDF).

NoticeThe Conceptual Physics Alive Digital content is protected by copyright laws. Replicating and distributing this digital content without the authority of the copyright owner is an infringement of the copyright. This digital content can be used in physical or remote classroom settings (e.g., Google Classroom, Canvas, etc.), or Homeschool.

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